intercept
[ in-ter-sept ]
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Part of SpeechverbOrigin + Etymology
Late-Middle English; in the senses, "contain between limits" and "halt (an effect);" from the Latin intercept- "caught between," from the verb intercipere, from inter- "between" + capere "take"
Synonyms
verb
ambusharrestblockcatchdeflect
Antonyms
verb
allowencouragefreegiverelease
Definition
verbto take, seize, or halt (someone or something on the way from one place to another); cut off from an intended destination
Examples
verbA) She had a plan to intercept the new project at her job and implement her own. B) The player needed to intercept the ball in order to help his team win.
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